Thursday, 28 October 2021

Astronomy Colloquium (6.7/2021):Analytical Solution of Magnetically Dominated Jets and Winds: Jet Launching, Acceleration, and Collimation

Calendar
研讨会日历
Date
06.07.2021 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Description

Title: Analytical Solution of Magnetically Dominated Jets and Winds: Jet Launching, Acceleration, and Collimation
Speaker: Liang Chen(陈亮)
 
Abstract: Jets are ubiquitously in association with different celestial objects. However, most of previous theoretical studies of them rely on numerical calculations, not being able to provide a more convenient way for understanding rather abundant observational results. Now we have obtained a general analytical solution for describing a magnetically dominated jet, through separating the jet “core equation” (which maintains the radial dynamic equilibrium) into rotating and non-rotating terms, finding that each of the two-term equations can be solved analytically, and the two solutions match each other very well. The analytical model based on this solution can explain the main results of jet observations and numerical simulations, such as jet shape configuration, acceleration profile (from non-relativistic to relativistic), and polarization pattern etc. Furthermore, the solution is applicable to, e.g., limb-brightening (a hollow jet), periodical variability (a helical jet), and "complex" proper motion pattern (a stratified jet) etc. I this talk, I will present the details of the theory, examples of comparing with observations, and a variety of predictions (Ref. Chen & Zhang, 2021, ApJ, 906, 105).
 
Brief Bio: 
I am intereting in black hole accretion and jet, extragalactic gamma-ray emission, cosmic magnetic field, cosmic ray, particle acceleration, and radiative processes.
2018-2019: University of Nevada Las Vegas, Visiting scholar
2012-present: Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, CAS
2010-2012: Postdoc, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, CAS
2005-2010: Ph.D., Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, CAS
 

Time: 14:00-15:00, 7/June, Monday

Venue: Room 508 (large seminar room), Department of Astronomy